Top Tips for Military Spouses Who Want to Continue School

As a military spouse, expanding your education can be beneficial to your family in plenty of ways. In terms of finances, it can definitely boost your earning power and help increase your career opportunities. Personally, getting a higher education can bring a feeling of fulfillment that lets you feel more confident about yourself and your future. Here are tips for you to consider:

Reflect on your overall goals, career-wise and personally.

Concentrate on something that is personally and professionally interesting to you. Go for a career that gives desirable pay, allows for a healthy work-life balance, and satisfies you overall.

Know the job market in your preferred field.

Will there be attractive and readily available opportunities for you? Is the profession or field less lucrative in certain parts of the country? If job opportunities are scarce, getting a degree or certification may not be worth the time and money you have to spend.

Take advantage of financial assistance such as military spouse scholarship programs.

There are several programs that can help military spouses deal with the costs of education. For example, the Military Spouse Career Advancement Account (MyCAA)will be able to cover a maximum of $4000 worth of costs if you’re aiming for an associate degree, credential or license. Several state colleges and universities offer in-state tuition rates, whatever the period of residence. As well, plenty of army spouse training scholarship programs that use different methods of financial aid, including low-interest federal loans. All branches of the military also extend financial assistance to U.S.-residing spouses with husbands stationed overseas.

Consider online career training for military spouses.

Since military families are always relocating, finishing local education programs is sometimes a challenge. Online Career Training Programs come with flexibility that benefits military families.

Fight for your transfer credits.

If you earned college credits from your old school and your target military spouse school will not give them credit, challenge this position. Schools generally have a process for this, and your advisor or counselor must be able to extend assistance. More information is usually requested, like a syllabus or course description. Challenges are generally successful upon providing additional information regarding those grades you have worked hard for in the past. If you end up with most of your credits still unaccepted, you can consider other schools which may be more consistent with your old school when it comes to accreditation and curriculum, and probably have transfer agreements in place (for example, junior colleges with local universities).

Act with good timing.

As you may already know, It can be a huge challenge to combine family, work and school responsibilities. However, with proper planning, you won’t have to compromise or sacrifice any of these areas of your life.